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About Us

Chippewa Nature Center is a non-profit organization, open to the public year-round. Its mission is to connect all people with nature through educational, recreational and cultural experiences.

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CNC History

Chippewa Nature Center (CNC) got its start in 1963 when Midland Nature Club President, Howard Garrett, appointed a committee to explore the idea of establishing a nature center.  A year later, Eugene Kenaga approached the Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation about establishing the center and they were very positive.  The Dow Foundation owned 198 acres at the confluence of the Pine and Chippewa Rivers and in November, 1965 they agreed to reserve that property for the nature center.  They leased that land to Chippewa Nature Center until 1975 when they donated that parcel and eight other leased properties to the Center.

Over time, CNC expanded program offerings to include adults and families. Plans to build a visitor center started in 1969 and were realized with a one million dollar gift from the Dow Foundation. On May 17, 1975, the Visitor Center opened to the public. The building includes exhibits, a wildlife viewing area, and classrooms used to bring people and nature together.

Through the years, the Center continued to grow in both programming and facilities.  Visitor Center renovations in 2000 and 2010 provided new opportunities for hands-on learning and nature education through the addition of an Ecosystem Gallery and Nature Discovery Area.

A major program expansion occurred in 2007 with the addition of a nature-based preschool operating from the Nature Study Building.  This program fuses early childhood education with environmental education to develop a child’s lifelong connection to the natural world.  A permanent home for this program opened in 2009 with completion of the Margaret Ann (Ranny) Riecker Nature Preschool Center.

Today Chippewa Nature Center is one of the largest private non-profit nature centers in the United States. Through the years CNC has grown from its original 198 acre parcel and an all-volunteer staff to include over 1,200 acres, 40 staff members and hundreds of volunteers. Over 60,000 people visit CNC every year, including 20,000 school children and 700 Nature Day Campers.

(For a detailed account of our beginnings, ask to see a copy of Chippewa Nature Center: The First Twenty-Five Years, at the Naturalist Station.)